Research & Innovation News

Open Access Government has a large variety of Scientific Research and Innovation information that is available in this category.

This section explores the latest breakthroughs in all aspects of science: including Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology and Sociology. There is extensive research on psychological and social patterns that occur in everyday life.

Information is available on scientific policies that the government might adopt. Along with the changes and developments of global space policy. We cover the ongoing rise of anti-microbial resistance (AMR) and cancer research breakthroughs along with countries and their own individual research priorities.

Within this category we explore the massive increase and growth in CBD research and production, there is a lot of interesting information available.

Toxic waste/chemicals stored in barrels at a plant - blue cans with chemicals, industry oil barrels

Predictive toxicology evolving from in vivo to in vitro to in silico systems

Cecilia Van Cauwenberghe from Frost & Sullivan’s TechCasting Group, lifts the lid on predictive toxicology evolving from in vivo to in vitro to in silico systems starting with a look at organoids & organ-on-chip microfluidic devices.
The logo of Erasmus on a white t-shirt with blurred background

Innovation, research, culture & education policy

Open Access Government provides an update on the policies of Mariya Gabriel, European Commissioner for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth.
prevent dementia

Consuming cranberries could improve memory and prevent dementia

Including cranberries in your diet has a whole host of benefits - it can improve memory and brain function, lower ‘bad’ cholesterol and prevent dementia.
Van parked up on grassy area; adults and children sitting and standing around it participating in outreach event

You Don’t Get Me: Public Responses to Mood and Behaviour Monitoring Wearable Technology

A diverse group of researchers opted for a unique, unorthodox approach to gathering opinions on mental health, relationships and wearable technology that can monitor...
super earth

New ‘super Earth’ discovered where you could live for more than 29,000 years

Scientists have discovered two ‘super Earth’ type planets about 100 light-years from our Earth where 1 year is 8.5 days.
Man and woman looking down at ancient footprints on beach in Formby

What can we learn from ancient footprints found on a Merseyside beach?

What can we learn from the discovery of hundreds of ancient footprints belonging to animals and humans on a Merseyside beach?
digital healthcare

20 years of impactful healthcare innovation

Graham Watson, Executive Chair at InnoScot Health, explains how the firm’s special 20th anniversary celebrates international healthcare innovation success.
Computer data security concept

National security needs a dose of innovation to deal with tomorrow’s threats

Saj Huq, head of innovation at Plexal discusses national security amongst nation states, and the need for better technology, ideas and innovations.
Science exhibition in Geneva

Why the European scientific ecosystem must recognise smaller research infrastructures

If supported, small- and medium-sized research infrastructures have the potential to boost the resilience of European society.
The coloured lines show how cosmic rays are deflected in magnetic fields. The white straight lines represent a large-scale magnetic field. In addition, small-scale magnetic fields not shown here act on the paths of the particles (coloured lines). Credit: RUB, Dr. Lukas Merten

New computer simulation aids in the search for the origin of cosmic rays

By simulating the transport of cosmic rays with a new computer program, international scientists are hoping to uncover the sources of these atom fragments.

How the pandemic was the catalyst for geospatial innovation

Geospatial technology, or geographic information systems (GIS), has become an essential instrument in multiple areas today: agriculture and aviation, construction and commerce, climate research and law enforcement—the list could go on.
lateral flow test device

Digital reader improves the accuracy of reporting positive lateral flow tests

Rob Banathy, Senior Product Manager at NHS Digital, explains how his team developed a lateral flow device digital reader service that can detect nearly twice the number of positive COVID-19 cases during early infection compared to the human eye.

Planetary heist: how can planets get stolen by massive stars?

Research shows how Jupiter-sized planets can be stolen or captured by massive stars in what is colloquially described as a planetary heist.
Toronto, canada city skyline

Developing Canadian leadership & excellence in science & innovation

The Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry of the Government of Canada, writes about developing Canadian Leadership and excellence in science and innovation.
Young woman on phone in bed, blue light contributing to aging process

Could reducing screen time slow down the aging process?

Excessive screen time is linked to obesity, psychological problems and even acceleration of aging - could reducing blue light really slow down the aging process?

The Phantom Galaxy: a Hubble and James Webb collaboration

A collaboration of the two greatest telescopes has resulted in this stunning image of the phantom galaxy Messier 74 located 32 million lightyears away.

Viewing the universe: The “incredible” auroras of Jupiter

It seems every week the magic of the James Webb telescope grips us all again, viewed in unprecedented detail the telescope has revealed the giant storms, moons, rings and auroras of Jupiter.
The Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai eruption as seen from orbit.

The Tonga volcano eruption caused a 90-metre-high tsunami wave

The tsunami wave created by the Tonga volcano eruption reached over 90 metres in height, which is approximately nine times taller than the Japan tsunami in 2011.
Woman walking into tunnel of fire; symbolising what someone might see on a psychedelic or hallucinogenic trip

More and more Americans are taking hallucinogenic drugs

Hallucinogenic drug use has increased amongst adults aged 26 and over, with over 5.5 million people using psychedelic substances in 2019.
EU European Union flags in front of European Comission building in Background - horizon disagreements

UK to launch formal dispute against the EU over ongoing Horizon disagreements

The UK government is poised to launch formal dispute proceedings against the EU under the claim that Brussels has broken its post-Brexit trade deal.

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