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early alzheimers disease, virtual reality

Virtual reality can spot problems in early Alzheimer’s disease

The University of Cambridge found that virtual reality (VR) can identify early Alzheimer’s disease better than ‘gold standard’ cognitive tests currently in use.
robot therapists, technical university of munich

What if we had robot therapists instead of humans?

The Technical University of Munich (TUM) have published an initial study into how AI robot therapists could be used in the future to treat mental illness: Here we examine their ethical concerns.
teenage life satisfaction, social media

Social media has debateable effect on teenage life satisfaction

Oxford researchers conducted a study of 12,000 British teenagers, which shows links between social media and teenage life satisfaction are small at best, but can change depending on gender and how the data is analysed.
fda approval, new drug

How can you improve your chances of FDA approval?

Here Dr. Harneet Arora, freelance neurologist, and FDA regulations expert, shares her advice on how to submit an application with FDA approval.
issue of antimicrobial resistance, economics of climate change

How can economics tackle the issue of antimicrobial resistance?

Applying the economics of climate change to antimicrobial resistance could help to avert the 10 million deaths that are predicted to occur by 2050 if urgent action isn’t taken.
sleeping and ageing, treatment for insomnia

Sleep and ageing: Two sides of one coin?

Oxford University researchers have discovered a brain process common to sleep and ageing in research that could pave the way for new treatments for insomnia.
evasive Prime minister, theresa may

Theresa May: The most evasive Prime Minister?

Research at the University of York has shown that British Prime Minister, Theresa May, is the most evasive when responding to questions compared to the last four Conservative Prime Ministers.
personalised IBD treatment, prognostic test

New prognostic test could make personalised IBD treatment

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a new test that can reliably predict the future course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in individuals, transforming treatments for patients.
heart failure treatment, erectile dysfunction

Sex drug could be the next heart failure treatment

The University of Manchester found that a drug used for erectile dysfunction can slow or even reverse the progression of heart failure of sheep.
modern slavery in UK, UK car washes

Over 900 reports of modern slavery in UK car washes

Drivers reported more than 900 potential cases of modern slavery at hand car washes over a five-month period, according to research by the University of Nottingham.
one third of oceans, global ocean treaty

Map can protect one third of oceans by 2030

As governments meet at the UN to negotiate towards an historic Global Ocean Treaty, a groundbreaking study by leading marine biologists has mapped out how to protect over a third of the world’s oceans by 2030.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, multimorbidity

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Ageing and multimorbidity

It is estimated that more than 3 million people in the UK have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD.
mindreading neurons, simulation neurons

Scientists find “mindreading” neurons in some brains

Scientists have identified special types of "mindreading" neurons that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions.
mining industry, mining paradigm

Resourcing modern industries by responsive mining solutions

Kate Moore, Senior Lecturer, University of Exeter, discusses whether small mining operations can supply the raw materials for manufacturing of modern technologies.
human body in space, NASA twins study

NASA research reveals what happens to human body in space

Results from NASA's landmark Twins Study reveals interesting, surprising and reassuring data about how one human body in space adapted to, then recovered from, that extreme environment.
black hole image seen, supermassive black hole

Black hole image seen by humanity for the first time

Scientists working with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) have revealed the fruits of an all-consuming attempt to see the impossible: In 2019, we now have the first-ever image of a black hole.
neurotrophin signalling

Complexity of neurotrophin signalling in the nervous system

Momoko Takahashi, a Doctoral Student at Northwestern University, explains the complex research of neurotrophin signalling in the nervous system in this report.
neighbourhood diversity, generational differences

Perceptions of neighbourhood diversity: Are there generational differences?

Dr Kirsten Visser, Utrecht University, explores if there are generational differences in the perceptions of neighbourhood diversity.
peru fossil discovery, whales walked on land

Peru fossil discovery shows that whales walked on land

42.6 million years ago, whales walked on land and swam in the sea: Scientists unearthed an unusual fossil of the amphibious whale along the Coast of Peru.

The biology of “love”: Lessons from prairie voles

Sue Carter, Director of The Kinsey Institute, discusses the fascinating nature of prairie voles and explains how they can teach us about the biology of “love”.

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