British international schools
ID 98735187 © Undrey | Dreamstime.com

Teaching abroad direct found in the next ten years, British international schools will require 230,000 more teachers to meet staffing needs

Recognised as the world’s best; a British education is becoming increasingly popular with parents around the world. This is pleasing news for the 4,300 British international schools* which operate globally and make up over 45% of the international school market.

Per the report Teacher Supply in British International Schools (July 2018) by the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) between January 2012 and January 2018, the international schools sector grew by 6% per annum. That’s 450 new schools each year, on average. Proving the market is of profitable value.

In fact, collectively the British international schools’ sector is reportedly worth more than £1 billion. As one of the UK’s leading exports, the sector contributes to the UK economy through franchises, use of educational goods and services, and repatriation of salaries.

To explore further, Teaching Abroad Direct sought to identify why teachers choose to work abroad and the reasons teachers might leave the sector, to better understand what needs to be done to attract, recruit and retain teachers so urgently needed.

To achieve this Teaching abroad direct pulled facts from the Teacher Supply report by COBIS.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, a desire for ‘Travel and Cultural Exploration’ tops the list of reasons teachers choose to work in the international schools’ sector, at 71%. This is followed by the prospect of ‘Enjoyment and Challenge’ (63%.)

However, disappointingly, a ‘Dissatisfaction with Home Education System’ is the third most prolific reason, with 47% of teachers agreeing so. The potential for ‘Career Growth’ (45%) and ‘Salary’ (44%) are other, prominent factors as to why teachers work abroad. Of less interest, regarding the reasons teachers choose to work in the international schools’ sector, is ‘Cost of Living’ (24%) and ‘CPD and Training’ at 15%.

Comparably, Teaching Abroad Direct found the reasons teachers might leave the international schools’ sector and return to the UK to be led by ‘Family Commitments’ (45%) and simply a desire to ‘Return Home’ (41%.)

While 27% of teachers say ‘Career Prospects Elsewhere’ is the reason they would disband from teaching abroad.

To ‘Improve Quality of Life’ (13%) and ‘High Living Expenses’ (9%) land in fourth and fifth place as to why teachers return to the UK from teaching abroad.

Andrew Lynch, a senior consultant for Teaching Abroad Direct, comments: “The shortage of teachers around the globe is an urgent issue. At the root, we must do
what we can to make teaching fulfilling. Of course, fulfilment differs from person to
person but, communication is key. We need to listen to teachers, both aspiring and
experienced, learn what they need and deserve from their post and environment. Whether that is abroad or at home.”

 

*British international schools are those located outside the UK that teach a curriculum (wholly or in part) that would be recognised in the UK and that have a British ethos.

US Election 2020

1 COMMENT

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here